Homeland Security Council

What the Council Does

Wisconsin’s Homeland Security Adviser and 16 member council is responsible for advising the governor, coordinating state and local prevention and response efforts, and producing periodic reports on the state of homeland security in Wisconsin. The council works with local, state, federal, and tribal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and private industry to improve citizen and community preparedness. The governor is responsible for appointing council members. Additionally, a member of the governor’s staff is invited to attend and participate at each meeting.

By appointment of the Governor, the Adjutant General of the Wisconsin National Guard serves as Wisconsin’s Homeland Security Adviser and chairs the Homeland Security Council.

The Council meets monthly, on the third Wednesday of each month. Meetings may last approximately 2 hours and include closed and open session portions. Members of the public are encouraged to attend the council’s open sessions.

Announcements of meetings are posted on this site, in the lobby of the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs, and on the State Capitol’s bulletin board. Due to scheduling conflicts and real-world events, meetings may be scheduled on different dates or occur more frequently. Generally speaking, however, the Council meets twelve times over the course of a year.

Registration now open for 6th annual Governor’s Cybersecurity Summit

MADISON, Wis. — More than 5,200 people in Wisconsin reported being a victim of a cyber crime last year, which the FBI says resulted in the loss of more than $15.8 million dollars. That’s why government, business and academic leaders are coming together to discuss how to combat this growing threat to our state at the 2018 Governor’s Cybersecurity Summit.

Gov. Walker discusses ‘If You See Something, Say Something’ initiative and public safety with law enforcement officials

MADISON, Wis. — Gov. Scott Walker joined Maj. Gen. Don Dunbar, law enforcement officers, FBI, and representatives from the Wisconsin Homeland Security Council today to discuss the public’s role in keeping communities safe.

The Department of Homeland Security’s “If You See Something, Say Something™” campaign encourages citizens to report suspicious behavior or activities to local law enforcement, which has proved instrumental in preventing dangerous crimes.

“Our nation’s law enforcement do incredible work to keep us all safe each and every day, but they can’t be everywhere at once — that’s where the ‘If You See Something, Say Something’ campaign comes in,” Walker said. “So as we begin this holiday season and enjoy spending time with our loved ones, we also encourage everyone to be vigilant and report anything suspicious to local authorities. Similar to a neighborhood watch, these civilian tips help our law enforcement better do their jobs in preventing crime and keeping others safe.”

In September 2012, Walker, former Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen, Dunbar and officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security unveiled Wisconsin’s “See Something, Say Something™” campaign. This included the launch of a new website, www.wiwatch.org, a special phone number to reach law enforcement agents at 1-877-949-2824 (877-WI-WATCH), and a statewide awareness campaign. The website and phone number are still operational today and several large venues, such as sporting events, continue to promote “If You See Something, Say Something™”.

“Citizens play an important role in keeping our communities safe,” said Dunbar, Wisconsin’s adjutant general and Wisconsin’s Homeland Security advisor. “Reporting suspicious activities to law enforcement such as an unattended backpack or briefcase in a public place, a vehicle that is parked in a strange location, or someone who is acting unusual could possibly prevent a tragedy.”

The Wisconsin “If You See Something, Say Something™” campaign is coordinated by the state’s two fusion centers — the Wisconsin Statewide Information Center (WSIC) in Madison and the Southeastern Wisconsin Threat Analysis Center (STAC) in Milwaukee. Both fusion centers serve local, county, and state public safety customers by sharing intelligence, offering training on the behaviors and indicators of terrorism, protecting Wisconsin’s critical infrastructure through risk assessments, and analyzing national threat information as it relates to Wisconsin.

For more information on the “If You See Something, Say Something™” initiative, please visit the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s website https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something.